Building an Archaeological Garden in Your Backyard

If you are looking for something new and interesting for your child, you may want to build them an archaeological garden in your backyard. An archaeological garden is a pit designed to look like an archaeological dig site. You can fill the inside of the pit with faux artifacts like coins or broken pottery to give your child something to dig for. Planting ivy or other growing vines on the outside will give the site an ancient atmosphere. Just make sure your garden and your trees have no infestation of harmful insects that might bite your kids and cause them illness. You can request for tree trimming and inspection from your local tree services so they can check on schedule, just for safety purposes. I know it’s part of nature and we encourage our kids to love nature by this activity. Just some minor precautions to be aware of, before the real fun starts. 🙂

Here is a quick guide to building your own backyard archaeological garden:

Install the support poles

First, lay out the weed barrier fabric over the site you have chosen for your archaeological garden. This fabric will choke off the grass and weeds while still allowing for drainage. Set your poles on top of the weed barrier, making a square. This will be the outline of the pit for your archaeological garden. To create the supports for your archaeological pit, dig a small hole at each corner. Set an upright pole in the hole and fill with quick-drying cement to hold the pole in place.

Build up the pit’s walls

Once the cement has dried and the upright poles of your archaeological garden are set, you need to build up the pit’s wall. Set the horizontal poles in place by bolting them onto the upright support poles. Stack these horizontal poles as high as you wish, but at least two poles works best. If you build the archaeological pit very high, you should also add a step stool or stairs so your child can get in and out easily.

Hang the ivy

Affix a sturdy steel rope to the tops of the upright support poles. You will be planting ivy that will grow up the upright poles and onto the ropes to give your archaeological garden more of an ancient ruins look. Be sure that the rope does not hang low enough that it will trap your child. You may want to leave the rope off of one of the side so there is an clear entrance for children.

Fill in the pit

Now you can fill the inside of your archaeological garden with some “treasures” for your child to find. Old coins, small toys, or broken pieces of pottery work well. Be sure that any sharp edges have been filed down if you choose to use broken items of pottery or ceramics. Fill in the pit with sand, layering in more of your archaeological “treasures” every so often. Attach some plastic hooks on the support holes and hang a plastic collection tray and sieve for your child to use as their archaeological tools.

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